Middlesex Community College will celebrate Constitution Day with an art exhibition, a singing of the National Anthem, perspectives from a Holocaust survivor, and a musical rendition of the Bill of Rights. This vivid and unique opportunity is free and open to the public.

The kick off event on Sunday, September 14 is the Commemoration of the 200-Year Anniversary of the National Anthem. This event features a history of “The Star Spangled Banner,” a personal testimonial from a survivor of Nazi Germany, readings of original poems on freedom from high school students, and a singing of the national anthem. K-12 student artwork will be on display as well. The program will take place 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.in Chapman Hall, located at Middlesex Community College, 100 Training Hill Road, Middletown. The K-12 Student Art Exhibition will be open from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm. For more information, contact Professor Judith de Graffenried at jdegraffenried@mxcc.edu.

The second event is a concert performed by Neely Bruce, professor at Wesleyan University. The performance is titled “The Bill of Rights: Ten Amendments in Eight Motets” and features the singing group Festival Harmony. The performance will take place from 12:30 p.m. to 1:20 p.m. on Wednesday, September 17 in Chapman Hall room 808, located at Middlesex Community College, 100 Training Hill Road, Middletown. This event is made possible with support from the Middletown Commission on the Arts and the Middlesex Community College Student Senate. For more information, contact Professor Rebecca Loew at rloew@mxcc.edu.

“The U.S. Bill of Rights plays a central role in American law and government and we are delighted to have this opportunity to reflect on the content and significance of this document through the medium of superb music,” said Rebecca Loew, assistant professor and coordinator of “The Bill of Rights” performance. “Civic engagement is a core principal of democracy and part of our responsibility as educators is to prepare students to effectively participate in our democracy.”