The following courses are open to all students.  None of them require placement testing, completion of previous college courses, or enrollment in a specific academic program.

(THIS PAGE WAS LAST UPDATED 02/25/2017)

Accounting (ACC*)

ACC*100, Basic Accounting (3 Credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Critical Analysis & Logical Thinking
A course in the basic accounting principles with emphasis on recording procedures and payroll for service businesses and professional offices. Students with no previous accounting exposure and limited college course experience should consider taking this course before taking ACC*115 Financial Accounting. It will satisfy a business or open elective requirement. May not be taken after ACC*115 unless student received a D or F grade.  (Updated October 2014)


Art (ART*)

ART*109, Color Theory (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
This course is an examination of the action and interaction of color and a study of the visual and psychological factors related to color perception. Students are responsible for purchasing their own supplies.  (Updated November 2014)


ART*111, Drawing I (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
A study of form through gesture, contour line, and the use of light and shade. Various mediums including conte crayon, charcoal, and ink are used in the study of still life and controlled subject matter. Composition is emphasized. (Updated November 2014)


ART*116, Perspective Drawing (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
The system of linear perspective as a method of producing a two-dimensional representation of the three-dimensional world. Problems in one, two, and three-point perspective with some use of projection methods. (Updated November 2014)


ART*122, Three-Dimensional Design (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
Use of a variety of materials to investigate the interrelationships of spaces, planes, and volumes. (Updated November 2014)


ART*147/COM*147, Digital Cinematography (3 Credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

An introduction to photographic principles as they apply to movies and video. This course will use both digital still and video cameras, and cover topics such as composition,depth-of-field, lenses, focal length, exposure, focus, filters, camera angles, camera operation, camera movement, visual effects, and principles of lighting and color; as well as the roles of the Director of Photography and other camera and lighting crew on a production.This is a hands-on course with students completing a series of practical exercises and production assignments. (Updated November 2014)


ART*163, Ceramic Handbuilding (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
An Introduction to the fundamentals of ceramic design and construction. Pinch, coil, slab, and modeling techniques will be employed to create functional and sculptural works in clay. Surface treatments, glazing applications, kiln loading and firing processes will be covered. Historical and contemporary approaches to ceramics will be emphasized. Students will need to purchase their own materials and tools. This is a “D” course.  (Updated November 2014)


ART*165, Metal and Jewelry Design I (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
An introduction to basic jewelry techniques such as metal forming, metal weaving, sawing, soldering, and working with hand tools. Students work in base metals such as copper and bronze, or in sterling silver. Design will be heavily emphasized. Students will furnish their own hand tools and materials which will cost about $50.  (Updated November 2014)


ART*166, Metal and Jewelry Design II (3 credits/4 contact hours)    $$ Studio Course Fee
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
An introduction to casting techniques: the primitive techniques such as coal casting, drop casting, cuttle bone casting that are used in less developed countries, as well as the sophisticated technique of lost-wax casting; students will learn how to carve wax, make temporary molds, and ultimately spin molten metal, translating their wax patterns into finished pieces of jewelry. Some materials and tools to be provided by the student which will cost about $50.  (Updated November 2014)


ART*250, Digital Photography (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Aesthetic Dimensions, Continuing Learning/Information Literacy

An introduction to digital photography including hardware and software, camera handling and creative controls, file formats and management, image editing,manipulation and output options using Adobe Photoshop. Through demonstrations and assignments, a survey of imagery and a final portfolio, students will be introduced to the basic vocabulary, concepts, tools, and expressive possibilities of digital photography. Students must own a 3 megapixel (or greater) digital camera with manual, aperture priority and/or shutter priority exposure modes, There will be some additional expenses. Basic computer and photographic experience preferred.  (Updated November 2014)


Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD*)

CAD*110, Introduction to CAD (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Continuing Learning/Information Literacy

An introduction to the techniques of generating graphic images with computers using AutoCAD. Topics include: overview of CAD terminology, computer terminology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management, two dimensional geometric construction, symbol library creation, dimensioning, scaling, sectioning, plotting, detail and assembly drawings including tolerance studies.   (Updated November 2014)


CAD*171, Mechanical 3-D CAD (Autodesk Inventor) (3 credits)
The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to engineering graphics through the use of computers and Autodesk Inventor. Students learn through a “hands-on” exercise intensive approach to concepts of engineering graphics. Students create rough 2-D sketches, apply/modify constraints and dimensions to the sketch, and extrude, revolve, or swept the design to create a 3-D model. The emphasis of the lessons are placed on graphical analysis, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, dimensioning methods, sectioning, creating assembly and working drawings with adherence to recognized drafting standards. (New course, Fall 2017)


Chinese (CHI*)

CHI*101, Elementary Chinese I (3 credits)
Presents the essentials of Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese.  Includes grammatical structures and vocabulary needed to read, write, and interact in Chinese using simple phrases and common expressions while highlighting the diverse cultures of Chinese-speaking peoples.  Students must concurrently enroll in CHI*105. This is a “D” course.  (Updated November 2014)


CHI*105, Elementary Conversational Chinese I (1 credit)
Development of conversational proficiency with emphasis on dialogues including a wide range of vocabulary necessary for general conversation.  Dialogues and oral practice are correlated with grammar covered in the three credit CHI*101 course.  Students must concurrently enroll in CHI*101. This is a “D” course.  (Updated November 2014)


Communications (COM*)

COM*104, Careers in Media (3 credits)
Exploration and research of careers in media covering the fields of journalism,advertising, public relations, broadcasting, television, film making, recording,digital multimedia and other media arts. Course utilizes guest speakers discussing career preparation, job requirements and responsibilities. Job targeting, networking, interviewing skills, resume and portfolio preparation are also taught.  (Updated November 2014)


COM*125/DGA*125, New Media Production (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena

This course is an introduction to the production of new media. New media is an emerging communications technology that adds on-demand interactive access to media content fostering creative participation and community formation.Students will learn to develop and produce a variety of digital media including, audio, video, photography, animation and web-design, and make that media accessible over the Internet and mobile devices through wikis, blogs, podcasts, and social media.Students will use professional media creation tools such as cameras, video and audio edition applications, content management systems and Internet radio, music creation, and podcast software. (Updated November 2014)


COM*130, Introduction to Broadcast Communications (3 credits)
This course serves as an introduction to broadcast writing, production, and distribution. Areas covered include program development, copy and scriptwriting,production techniques, FCC regulations, broadcast technology and operation, and new methods of program delivery. Emphasis will be on developing effective communication skills through written assignments, research, and the production of radio and television programming. (Updated November 2014)


COM*131, Audio Production (3 credits)
Students will learn the techniques and technologies used in creative sound design for radio, television, film and the Internet. Emphasis is on the technical skills used in recording, mixing, and editing. Students will create projects focusing on the fundamentals of sound design for various applications. (Updated November 2014)



COM*179/THR*113, Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

This course will develop performance and acting skills used in radio,television, and film including voice-over techniques, television news reporting and anchoring, dramatic acting, and comedic performance. Skills include voice articulation, projection and inflection, script analysis and interpretation. Students will analyze scripts and develop characters to improve acting and directing techniques and understand the importance of subtext to scenes. Students perform using microphones, teleprompters, lighting, and cameras. This course is designed for students interested in on-screen performance across a range of media as well as those interested in film and television directing and production. (Updated November 2014)


COM*294, Media Arts Workshop (3 credits)
The Media Arts Workshop is a summer honors program with the goal of producing a collaborative work of outstanding professional quality. This workshop is open to students in Broadcast-Cinema, Communications Arts, Multimedia or a related discipline. Students will learn by working with media professionals for training and guidance and by working together as a team to complete a film,video or interactive media presentation. Enrollment is by application only. Prerequisites are courses and/or experience in the student’s field of study and presentation of an accomplished portfolio and possible interview.  (Updated November 2014)


Computer Science (CS_*)

CSC*095, Basic Computer Skills (1 Credit)
This preparatory course gives students the fundamental skills necessary to gain a basic understanding of how to use a personal computer.The course teaches basic keyboarding techniques, the fundamentals of the Windows environment, file management,Internet research, and email. Students with little or no hands-on experience with computers should take this basic skills course before taking any of the computer courses. This course cannot be counted toward graduation credit. (Updated October 2014)



CSC*115, Introduction to Programming with Alice (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Continuing Learning/Information LiteracyCritical Analysis & Logical Thinking

This course teaches students the fundamentals of object-oriented programming using Alice, a three-dimensional graphical system that is used to create three-dimensional worlds of animation and games. The course allows students to gain an understanding of the same fundamentals object-oriented principles that are taught with traditional languages such as Java or Visual Basic. However, students will learn and practice these techniques as they create exciting virtual worlds, thus making programming easier to learn. The intent is to provide students who are new to programming with an understanding of abstract principles in concrete ways. Students will be able to apply these skills to other object-oriented languages. (Updated October 2014)


Criminal Justice (CJS*)

CJS*151, Criminal Justice Supervision and Administration (3 credits)
In this course students study the essentials of personnel administration,management and supervision within criminal justice agencies. Topics include supervisory principles, discipline, motivation, training, ethics, recruitment,managing and supervising in a diverse workplace, and interviewing techniques. (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


Digital Arts/Multimedia (DGA*)

DGA*101, Introduction to Digital Arts (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

A hands-on introduction to the field of digital multimedia which integrates text, images, graphics, sounds, video, and animation in an interactive computer environment. Students will learn about multimedia technology, terminology,production techniques, and software. Production work will include an introduction to multimedia authoring. (Updated November 2014)


DGA*110, Computer Graphics (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

An introduction to the computer as a tool for art and media imaging. Basic computer skills and an introduction to the major applications used for digital illustration, image manipulation, and page layout.  (Updated November 2014)



Early Childhood Education (ECE*)

ECE*103, Creative Art Experiences for Children (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Aesthetic Dimensions, Critical Analysis & Logical Thinking, Oral Communication in English, Social Phenomena
The exploration of the relationship of creative art to the total educational program of the young child. Experimentation with the use of various media techniques and methods will be included. (Updated November 2014)


ECE*106, Music and Movement for Children (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Aesthetic Dimensions, Oral Communication in EnglishSocial Phenomena

An investigation of the role of music and movement in early childhood development. Emphasis will be on the elements of songs, circle games, rhythmic activities and instruments. (Updated November 2014)


ECE*141, Infant/Toddler Growth & Development (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Critical Analysis & Logical Thinking, Historical Knowledge, Oral Communication in English, Social Phenomena

An introduction to the care and teaching of infants and toddlers, which emphasizes the interrelationship between social, emotional, cognitive, physical and language development. Age appropriate curriculum strategies will be based on developmental theories. Components of a high quality program will be explored. Students are required to complete 10 hours of field observation and participation in an infant/ toddler program. (Updated November 2014)


ECE*176, Health, Safety, and Nutrition (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Critical Analysis & Logical ThinkingHistorical KnowledgeOral Communication in EnglishSocial Phenomena

The relationship between health, safety and nutrition and child development will be explored. Emphasis will be on the strategies needed to implement a safe, healthy and nutritionally sound program. Community agencies and resources that benefit children and families will be explored. (Updated November 2014)


ECE*180, CDA Preparation Course (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Critical Analysis & Logical ThinkingOral Communication in EnglishSocial Phenomena

Child Development Associate Preparation Course: This course will explore the process a student must undertake to be credentialed as a Child Development Associate. In addition, the course will provide a thorough review of each of the eight content areas as identified by the Council for early Childhood Professional Recognition; assist the student in the development of a Professional Resource File; and provide a meaningful field placement opportunity. (Updated November 2014)


Engineering (EGR*)

EGR*112, Engineering Drawing Specifications (3 Credits)
An introduction to the interpretation of engineering drawings beginning with the basics of orthographic projection. Topics include: working drawings, lines, linear and angular dimensioning, sectional views, tolerances and allowances, thread representation, arrowless and tabular dimensioning, steel specifications, auxiliary views, point-to-point and datum dimensioning conforming to ANSI Y14.5M and ISO standards.  (New course, Fall 2017)


English (ENG*)

EDUC 1003, English Fast Track (Reading-Writing) Workshop (0 credits, 24-30 classroom hours)
This non-credit, fast-track workshop is designed to help students refresh their skills in essay writing, grammar, and reading comprehension. The workshop will be particularly beneficial for students placing at the intensive level but are open to all students.  At the end of the workshop, students may retake a placement test to see if they can progress to College Level or College Level with Embedded Support(Updated November 2014)


EDUC 1010, Fast Track: Grammar (0 credits, 5-15 classroom hours)
This noncredit workshop is designed to help students refresh their skills in grammar and punctuation. This grammar workshop would be particularly beneficial for students who need to improve their Accuplacer Sentence Skills score. It is recommended that students who take this workshop also take Fast Track: Essay Writing. (New course, Spring 2015)


EDUC 1011  Fast Track: Reading (0 credits, 5-15 classroom hours)
This noncredit workshop is designed to help students refresh their skills in reading comprehension and vocabulary. This reading comprehension workshop would be particularly beneficial for students who need to improve their Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score. It is recommended that students who take this workshop also take Fast Track: Essay Writing. (New course, Spring 2015)


EDUC 1012  Fast Track: Essay Writing (0 credits, 5-15 classroom hours)
This noncredit workshop is designed to help students refresh their skills in essay writing. This workshop would be particularly beneficial for students who would like to become more familiar with college level essay writing. Fast Track: Essay Writing is strongly recommended for students taking Fast Track: Grammar, Fast Track: Reading, or both workshops. (New course, Spring 2015)


ENG*096, Introduction to College English (6 credits)
Prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college-level courses by integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading and writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. (Updated November 2014)


French (FRE*)

FRE*101, Elementary French I (3 credits)
Fundamentals of grammar with emphasis on the development of speaking, listening, and writing skills. Students must concurrently enroll in FRE*105.  (Updated November 2014)
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


FRE*105, Elementary Conversational French I (1 Credit)
Development of conversational proficiency with emphasis on dialogues including a wide range of vocabulary necessary for general conversation. Dialogues and oral practice are correlated with grammar covered in the three credit FRE*101 course. Students must concurrently enroll in FRE*101.  (Updated November 2014)
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


Freshman Seminar (FS)

FS100, Freshman Seminar (3 credits) 
The Freshman Seminar introduces the new student to diverse academic content, emphasizing learning strategies and critical thinking skills in preparation for more rigorous college study. This multidisciplinary course combines a faculty lecture series with small-group discussion sessions. Topics to be covered include introductory lectures on social sciences, natural/physical sciences, mathematics, humanities, business, and career opportunities. Highly recommended for both full-time students with two or more college prep placements and part-time students taking college prep courses. (Updated November 2014)


Geography (GEO*)

GEO*101, Introduction to Geography (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena
An introductory study of geography concerned with the basic patterns of physical environment and their relationship to man. Focus is upon not only where people and activities are located on the Earth’s surface and the reasons for the location but also upon geography as a social science, emphasizing the relevance of geographic concepts to human problems and conditions. As such the course’s use of physical geographic concepts will help students to better understand human behavior. A topical approach is used. Included are analyses of why languages, religions, and ethnicities are arranged as they are in the World and an examination of the significance of the locations of important economic activities, including agriculture, manufacturing, and services.  (Updated November 2014)  
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


History (HIS*)

HIS*101, Western Civilization I  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
A systematic study of the contributions of the ancient Middle East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome to Western Civilization. The above is followed by an examination of the first 1,200 years of Western History (Middle Ages, Renaissance, American Discovery, the Age of Absolutism) with an emphasis on religious, political, economic, intellectual, and social evolution.  (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*102, Western Civilization II (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
Students will explore significant economic, social, political, military, and intellectual trends in Western Society during the past three hundred years. Particular emphasis will be given to the ideas of political and economic freedom, the impact of the Industrial Revolution, changing intellectual climates, colonialism, the two World Wars, and the Cold War.  May be taken without HIS*101. (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*107, History of Puerto Rico (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge

This course will explore the political, social, economic and constitutional development of Puerto Rico from the early 16th century to the near present. Four centuries of Spanish colonization and the island’s dual role in the empire as a defensive outpost and producer of sugar, tobacco, and coffee forms the first part of the course. Next we examine how proximity to the United States in geographical, economic, and political terms has profoundly touched the lives of all Puerto Rican’s and influenced the development of island society. Finally, we consider the history of Puerto Rican communities in the northeastern United States that are the result of successive migratory waves that started early in the 20th century. (Updated November 2014)  
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*121, World Civilization I (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
This course examines the development of global history to 1500.  Coverage is organized into seven successive eras of world history, and focuses on the development of civilization in every region of the world and their interaction with other societies.  The latter allows for cross-cultural comparisons and provides insight into the consequences of cultural connections brought about by trade, transportation, and communication.  (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*122, World Civilization II (3 credits)   
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge

This course examines the development of global history since 1500.  Coverage is organized into three successive eras of world history.  The history of each region is examined as well as the interaction between different parts of the world.  The latter focus allows for cross-cultural comparisons and provides insight into the consequences of cultural connections brought about by trade, transportation, and communication.  (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*201, United States History I  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
Students will study the development of British North America from the establishment of the first colonies to the founding of the United States with an emphasis on the nature of immigration, slavery, and overall themes of colonialism. Likewise, students will explore United States development from the early days of the republic through the Civil War with a focus on regional development and Westward.  (Updated November 2014)  (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*202, United States History II (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
A systematic study of the United States from Reconstruction to the present, with special attention given to industrialism’s social, economic, and ideological impact, America’s changing ethnic make-up, race conflict, and changes in the United States’ international position through the two World Wars and the Cold War.  May be taken without HIS*201. (Updated November 2014) (Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


HIS*244, Europe in the 20th Century (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Historical Knowledge
Students will study Europe’s changing economic, social, military, and diplomatic trends from the late 19th Century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to the causes of the First World War, the Second World War, and the Cold War. (Updated November 2014)


Human Services (HSE*)

HSE*101, Introduction to Human Services (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena
An introduction to the scope and nature of the human services profession. Focus is on integrated service delivery and the student’s responsibility to the community.  (Updated November 2014)
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


Italian (ITA*)

ITA*101, Elementary Italian I  (3 credits) 
Fundamentals of grammar with emphasis on the development of speaking, listening, and writing skills. Students must concurrently enroll in ITA*105.  (Updated November 2014)
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


ITA*105, Elementary Conversational Italian I   (1 Credit) 
Development of conversational proficiency with emphasis on dialogues including a wide range of vocabulary necessary for general conversation. Dialogues and oral practice are correlated with grammar covered in the three-credit ITA*101 course. Students work with a media program at home for further intensive practice in speaking and listening. Students must concurrently enroll in ITA*101.   (Updated November 2014) 
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


Mathematics (MAT*)

EDUC 1002, Fast-Track Math Workshop (0 credits, 30 classroom hours)
This noncredit workshop is designed to help students refresh their skills in arithmetic and elementary algebra concepts. The workshop is targeted to benefit students placing at the intensive levels. At the end of the workshop, students may retake the placement test to see if they can progress to a course that is College Level or College Level with Embedded Support.  (Updated November 2014)


MAT*085, Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra Foundations (6 Credits)
This Intensive-Level developmental course does not meet graduation requirements.
Beginning Fall 2017, this course will be renumbered as MAT*095-I.

MAT*085 (MAT*095-I) is an introductory course that will emphasize the understanding of basic concepts and skills of arithmetic (whole numbers, signed numbers, decimals, fractions, ratios and proportions, percent and estimation), as well as introductory topics in algebra. This course includes a study of the basic properties and theorems of rational numbers; expressions and equations with polynomials, rational and radical expressions, and integer exponents; linear equations in one and two variables; systems of linear equations in two variables; functions; and applications in geometry and algebra. This course will support students with skill levels below 9th grade to achieve the learning outcomes of Beginning Algebra in a single semester. Credit does not count toward meeting degree requirements.  (Updated December 2016)


Manufacturing (MFG*)

MFG*051, Manufacturing Math I (3 developmental credits; does not count toward graduation)
First course in manufacturing mathematics. A study of arithmetic and algebraic operations applied to manufacturing circumstances. Fractions, decimals, tolerances, percentages, signed numbers, powers and roots, the metric system, as well as ratios and proportions are studied in depth. This course is not open to students who are eligible for 
MAT*137 or higher.  (Existing course, published September 2013)


MFG*120, Metrology (3 credits)
This course provides students with the basics in measurement for manufacturing, incorporating an introduction to the construction and usage of inspection tools, as well as a comprehensive set of hands-on exercises. These tools will be utilized to discover the dimensional characteristics of a variety of sample parts. (New course, Fall 2017)


MFG*123, Measurement for Manufacturing (2 credits)
This course provides students with the basics in measurement for manufacturing, incorporating an introduction to the construction and usage of inspection tools, as well as a comprehensive set of hands-on exercises.  In addition to teaching students how to use measuring tools, this course helps prepare students for NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) credentialing exams in Benchwork and Measurement, Materials, and Safety. (New course, January 2016)


Music (MUS*)

MUS*101, Music History and Appreciation I  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions, Historical Knowledge

Understanding and appreciation of music literature. Classic, Romantic, and Modern styles studied through the works of composers of those periods.  (Updated November 2014)


MUS*104, World Music (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic DimensionsHistorical Knowledge
A survey course designed for non-musicians and musicians alike. The course will explore aspects of musical form, melody, rhythm, timbre, texture and instrumentation as rendered meaningful by the global music community. Content may include the music of Asia, Africa, India, and the Americas (including rock, jazz, blues and Native American music). Music in relation to art, ritual, theater, dance, and lifestyles will be considered, as well as aspects of musical instruments, including construction and playing techniques. This is a “D” course. (Updated November 2014)


MUS*111, Fundamentals of Music I  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

Development of basic skills in note reading, rhythm, meter, pitch symbols, scales, key signatures, interval, triads and ear training. (Updated November 2014)


MUS*117, Electronic Music (3 credits) 
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic DimensionsHistorical Knowledge
Designed for the non-musician, this course focuses on the composition, creation, performing, and recording of music using modern production techniques. Students will learn the compositional elements of music including rhythm, music and chord theory, and song structure and then perform and record their compositions using MIDI keyboards and digital audio workstations. (Updated November 2014)


MUS*137, History and Appreciation of Jazz  (3 credits) 
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic DimensionsHistorical Knowledge
A music appreciation course that uncovers the development of Jazz, from ragtime to contemporary practice. (Updated November 2014)


MUS*138, Rock and Roll History and Appreciation (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic DimensionsHistorical Knowledge
A survey of the evolution of rock music and the origins, characteristics, stylistic development, and cultural/social perspectives.


MUS*152, Drumming and Percussion Ensemble (3 Credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions
Through ensemble playing, students will learn a variety of traditional rhythms such as African, Latin, Indonesian (gamelan), Middle Eastern, etc. Various percussion instruments and playing techniques will be studied, including improvisation. Students will also learn how to use found objects as instruments. The course includes some study of the cultures associated with various instruments. Students should obtain a drum for use in the ensemble. This is a “D” course.  Prior to the Fall 2016 semester, this course was offered for 2 credits.  Students who took this course prior to the Fall 2016 semester cannot retroactively receive 3 credits for this course.  (Updated May 2016)



Political Science &  Law (POL*)

POL*103, Introduction to International Relations  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena

This course examines international politics and has a focus on the United States in its superpower role. Relationships between nations which range from constructive engagement and peacemaking to war making will be examined. The Vietnam, Middle East, Balkan, Northern Ireland, and other conflicts will serve as case studies for understanding the forces shaping international politics. Present day topics concerning the United Nations, international terrorism, global capitalism, and others will be studied.  (Updated November 2014) 
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


POL*111, American Government (3 credits) 
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena

This course examines the patterns of politics in the nation, Constitution, Congress, and Presidency. Topics of study include political ideologies, interest group pluralism, citizen alienation, institutional power, democracy’s requirements, and others. Learning objectives include becoming politically informed, engaging in political discussions, and analyzing the government’s responsiveness to citizens’ needs.  (Updated November 2014)  
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.)


POL*112, State and Local Government   (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena
The forms, functions, processes and problems of state and local government in the United States.  Emphasis is on Connecticut, including the governorship and the General Assembly, state agencies, and localities with mayors, councils, and/or town meetings. (Updated November 2014)


POL*120, Introduction to Law   (3 credits)
The course serves as an introduction to the study of law with an overview of fundamental concepts and principles of the U.S. legal system. A variety of legal topics, terminology, and areas of law are discussed in order to assist students in acquiring an appreciation of the dynamic role of law in our changing society. Students are introduced to the roles of legal professionals, including paralegals. Legal reasoning, legal ethics, and legal research methods are also presented.  (New course, December 2014)


POL*293, Connecticut Legislative Internship (6 Credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Social Phenomena

This course is an active learning experience for the student as an intern in the state legislature. A student must apply directly to this college’s faculty representative for selection. Learning involves becoming informed of the General Assembly’s lawmaking processes, and developing skills to serve both the state legislator and his/ her constituents. The intern will have the opportunity for in-service orientation at the legislature prior to its January start. (Updated November 2014)

For more information about MxCC’s Legislative Internship Program, click here.
To learn more about MxCC’s current Legislative Interns,click here.


Psychology (PSY*)

PSY*103, Introduction to Holistic Wellness  (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competencies: Continuing Learning/ Information LiteracyOral Communication in English
This course will explore how cognition, emotion, stress, lifestyle, and the environment impact a person’s health and sense of well-being. Students will review the psychological and behavioral factors which enhance health and wellness while preventing one’s risk for illness. Students will learn how to become active participants in their journey toward wellness by studying and experiencing alternative, preventive, and stress reducing techniques. Modalities to be explored are the mind/body connection, relaxation, nutrition, exercise, and spirituality.  Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.  (Updated November 2014)


PSY*247, Industrial & Organizational Psychology (3 credits) 
Psychological principles are applied to business, industry, education, politics. Topics include job evaluation, motivation, management relations, individual and group relations. This course is appropriate as the psychology elective for the business and secretarial programs. Its transferability depends upon the policy of the receiving institution.  (Updated November 2014)


Spanish (SPA*)

SPA*111, Elementary Spanish I (4 credits)
This course replaces SPA*101 (3 credits) and SPA*105 (1 credit).
This course presents the essentials of Modern Standard Spanish. It consists of vocabulary and grammatical structures that will enable students to read, write, and interact in Spanish using simple phrases and common expressions, while also highlighting the diverse cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. This course also will feature an additional one-credit hour of instruction designed to develop students’ basic conversational skills, with particular emphasis on dialogue. In such dialogues, students will utilize a wide range of vocabulary necessary for general conversation. 
(Fulfills a “D” course requirement for students who enrolled in a degree program prior to the Fall 2016 semester.) (New course, December 2014)


Theater (THR*)

THR*110, Acting I (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

An introduction to the art of acting. This experiential course emphasizes the fundamental tools of the actor including use of voice and body, development of the imagination, creative interpretation, characterization, improvisation, and script analysis. Through both individual and group exercises, students will gain knowledge of different acting styles as well as study and perform scripts. (Updated November 2014)


COM*179/THR*113, Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
Gen Ed Competency: Aesthetic Dimensions

This course will develop performance and acting skills used in radio,television, and film including voice-over techniques, television news reporting and anchoring, dramatic acting, and comedic performance. Skills include voice articulation, projection and inflection, script analysis and interpretation. Students will analyze scripts and develop characters to improve acting and directing techniques and understand the importance of subtext to scenes. Students perform using microphones, teleprompters, lighting, and cameras. This course is designed for students interested in on-screen performance across a range of media as well as those interested in film and television directing and production. (Updated November 2014)


Therapeutic Recreation (RLS*)

RLS*121, Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services  (3 credits) 
Methods and activities that can aid in establishing better rapport with persons. Emphasis on therapeutic value of such experiences.  (Updated November 2014)


RLS*122, Processes and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation (3 credits)
This course provides an exploration of methods and materials utilized to lead people in creative/arts activities, physical/body movement activities, mental/stimulation activities, and social/interaction activities. The analysis of activities and the specific techniques for adapting activities in therapeutic recreation will be examined. (New course, November 2014)