$$ Laboratory Course Fee:  Many science lab courses require a separate fee added at the time of registration in order to cover the cost of supplies and materials used by students.

CJS*101,Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course examines an overview of the criminal justice system on the local, state and federal levels in the United States. Students will be exposed to the historical, theoretical, philosophical and practical perspectives of the system’s police, court and correctional agencies.  The course is required and is a core class in the Criminal Justice major.  This is a “D” course.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: Eligible for ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101(Updated January 2016) 


CJS*102, Introduction to Corrections (3 credits)
A study of the history, philosophy, and evolution of corrections as well as the functions of U.S. jails and prisons. The course also examines the procedures used by state and federal courts that result in the sentencing of offenders to penal institutions and community-based supervision and treatment programs.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 (can be taken concurrently) and eligible for ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or
ENG*101.  (Updated October 2015)


CJS*105, Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 credits)
This course offers a comprehensive examination of the public safety and law enforcement functions of government in a modern society. Topics covered will include the evolution, history, and philosophy of the law enforcement function: the role of the police in a democratic society; police accountability, corruption and deviance; police operational principles and practices; and, current problems confronting the police in their relationship to the community they serve. Prerequisite: CJS*101 (can be taken concurrently) and eligibility for ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101. (New course, effective Spring 2016)


CJS*106, Introduction to Homeland Security (3 credits)
New Course, Fall 2016: An introduction to the fundamental concepts of homeland security in the United States.  This course examines the planning, preparedness, management, and response of governmental and non-governmental agencies to man-made and natural disasters.  An historical perspective of events related to homeland security will also be examined in addition to technological and transportation implications. Prerequisite: CJS*101, which may be taken concurrently.
 (New course, effective Fall 2016)


CJS*151, Criminal Justice Supervision and Administration (3 credits)
In this course students study the essentials of personnel administration,management and supervision within criminal justice agencies. Topics include supervisory principles, discipline, motivation, training, ethics, recruitment,managing and supervising in a diverse workplace, and interviewing techniques. This is a ‘D’ course.  (Updated November 2014)


CJS*211, Criminal Law I (3 credits)
The study of the act(s) and mental state(s) which make up the elements of a crime.  The analysis of these criminal elements will allow exploration into a wide spectrum of criminal law including felonies and misdemeanors.  This is not a course specifically addressing Connecticut laws, although they will be discussed in comparison with other state and federal court decisions.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015)


CJS*212, Criminal Law II (3 credits)
A study of the act(s) and mental state(s) which make up the elements of a crime. The analysis of these criminal elements will allow exploration into a wide spectrum of criminal law including felonies and misdemeanors. This is not a course specifically addressing Connecticut laws, although they will be discussed in comparison with other state and federal court decisions.  Content of the course will build on the foundation laid in CJS*211: Criminal Law I.  Prerequisite: CJS*211 with a “C-” or better. (New course, effective Spring 2016)


CJS*213, Evidence and Criminal Procedure (3 credits)
This course provides students with fundamental principles relative to procedures and processes within the Criminal Justice system as applied to arrest,the use of force, and search and seizure. The course provides the student with an opportunity to examine the various types of evidence and “proof”in regard to kind, degree, admissibility, competence, and weight.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better,AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015) 


CJS*220, Criminal Investigation (3 credits)
In this course students study the fundamental principles and relative theories applicable to criminal investigation. The course includes the consideration of development of information sources, identification of witnesses and suspects,laws and techniques relative to interview and interrogation and admissions, and case preparation techniques. This is a “D” course. New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, ANDENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015) 


CJS*225, Forensic Science (3 credits)
A study of how the disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, and Physics meld to form the field of Forensic Science.  The course will focus on developing the scientific vocabulary necessary for investigators to communicate with scientists.  This course is meant to assist students who are pursuing a career in criminal justice.  Emphasis of the course is placed on scientific analysis of data rather than detective work.  Students will learn to appreciate how the major fields of science are utilized in solving crimes.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015) 


CJS*250, Police Organization and Management (3 credits)
This course exposes students to the complexities inherent in the administration of modern law enforcement organizations by presenting and analyzing a variety of management styles and administrative techniques used in such organizations.  Students will examine many of the internal and external factors that impact contemporary law enforcement organizations (e.g., federal regulations, political structures, community needs, press, etc.). New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015)


CJS*252, Professional Development- Leadership (3 credits)
The course is designed to provide students with fundamental and advanced components of leadership theory as it relates to Criminal justice organizations. Prerequisite: CJS*101 or permission of instructor  (Updated November 2014)


CJS*255, Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice Leadership (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the necessity of high standards of ethical and moral behavior in the justice system.  Areas of focus include ethical and moral issues in personal, social, and criminal justice contexts.  Comprehensive coverage is achieved through focus on law enforcement, legal practice, sentencing, corrections, research, crime control policy, and philosophical issues. This is an “L” course.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015) 


CJS*285 / SCI*285, Forensic Science with Laboratory (4 credits/6 contact hours) $$ Laboratory Course Fee
As of Fall 2016, this course will replace CJS*225 Forensic Science.  Students cannot get academic credit for taking both CJS*225 and CJS*285/SCI*285: 
A study of how the disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, and Physics meld to form the field of Forensic Science.  The course will focus on developing the scientific vocabulary necessary for investigators to communicate with scientists.  This course is meant to assist students who are pursuing a career in criminal justice.  Emphasis of the course is placed on scientific analysis of data rather than detective work.  Students will learn to appreciate how the major fields of science are utilized in solving crimes.  The laboratory component will provide hands-on opportunities to integrate scientific methodology as it relates to criminal justice and the limitations of scientific testing.    Prerequisite: CJS*101 with a grade of “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101 with a grade of “C-” or better. (New course, effective Fall 2016)


CJS*288, Careers in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
The course is designed to provide students with the practical skills necessary for employment within the field of criminal justice. Students will explore the physical, intellectual, and psychological demands associated with obtaining and maintaining a career within the field of criminal justice. The course will explore various types of job opportunities available within the courts, corrections, and law enforcement community, to include the application and selection process for each of these positions. Students will learn the various physical fitness standards associated with each position as well as the necessary written and oral communication skills. Students will draft both a cover letter and resume, in conjunction with participating in a mock oral board interview. Prerequisite:ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101 with a grade of “C” or better, AND completion of 12 credits in criminal justice courses. (New course, effective Spring 2016)


CJS*290, Practicum in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
Open to students in Criminal Justice programs, this practicum offers participants the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application. Assignments are individualized and may vary. Those who are not currently employed in a field directly related to their program may be assigned either a research project/paper or a supervised internship experience. Those currently employed in a field directly related to their study will be required to relate their experiences through appropriate assignments.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: Instructor Approval, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated January 2016) Old Prerequisite: CJS*101.


CJS*294, Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
In this course students will be exposed to the contemporary issues that impact the functions, and organization of Criminal Justice agencies in the United States. Topics in the course includes issues such as; racial profiling, torture, capital punishment, gender, social stratification, social class, politics, and use of force. The focus and content of the course will change each year to reflect the changes in political and social thought and their impact on public policy.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: Instructor approval AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or 
ENG*101 with a “C-” or better.  (Updated January 2016)


CJS*298, Special Topics in Criminal Justice  (1-3 credits)
Special topics courses may be offered for 1 to 3 credits, depending on the content of the class.  These courses are designed to expose students to a vast array of specialized topics within the field of criminal justice.  Three, 1-credit courses can be bundled to fulfill a criminal justice directed elective requirement.  New Prerequisite, effective Spring 2016: CJS*101 with a “C-” or better, AND ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E, or ENG*101with a “C-” or better.  (Updated October 2015)


SOC*240, Criminology (3 credits)
The course examines the nature and cause of crime, approaches to the study of crime, and its treatment and prevention.  The sociology of criminal law and the nature of criminal behavior are also examined. This is an “L” coursePrerequisite: Eligible for ENG*101-ALP, ENG*101E or ENG*101(Prerequisite updated October 2015, to add ENG*101-ALP)