HIS*101, Western Civilization I  (3 credits) 
A systematic study of the contributions of the ancient Middle East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome to Western Civilization. The above is followed by an examination of the first 1,200 years of Western History (Middle Ages, Renaissance, American Discovery, the Age of Absolutism) with an emphasis on religious, political, economic, intellectual, and social evolution.


HIS*102, Western Civilization II (3 credits) 
Students will explore significant economic, social, political, military, and intellectual trends in Western Society during the past three hundred years. Particular emphasis will be given to the ideas of political and economic freedom, the impact of the Industrial Revolution, changing intellectual climates, colonialism, the two World Wars, and the Cold War. (May be taken without HIS*101.) This is a “D” course.


HIS*107, History of Puerto Rico (3 credits)
This course will explore the political, social, economic and constitutional development of Puerto Rico from the early 16th century to the near present. Four centuries of Spanish colonization and the island’s dual role in the empire as a defensive outpost and producer of sugar, tobacco, and coffee forms the first part of the course. Next we examine how proximity to the United States in geographical, economic, and political terms has profoundly touched the lives of all Puerto Rican’s and influenced the development of island society. Finally, we consider the history of Puerto Rican communities in the northeastern United States that are the result of successive migratory waves that started early in the 20th century. This is a “D” course.


HIS*121, World Civilization I (3 credits) 
This course examines the development of global history to 1500.  Coverage is organized into seven successive eras of world history, and focuses on the development of civilization in every region of the world and their interaction with other societies.  The latter allows for cross-cultural comparisons and provides insight into the consequences of cultural connections brought about by trade, transportation, and communication.  This is a “D” course.


HIS*122, World Civilization II (3 credits)   
This course examines the development of global history since 1500.  Coverage is organized into three successive eras of world history.  The history of each region is examined as well as the interaction between different parts of the world.  The latter focus allows for cross-cultural comparisons and provides insight into the consequences of cultural connections brought about by trade, transportation, and communication.  This is a “D” course. 


HIS*201, United States History I  (3 credits) 
Students will study the development of British North America from the establishment of the first colonies to the founding of the United States with an emphasis on the nature of immigration, slavery, and overall themes of colonialism. Likewise, students will explore United States development from the early days of the republic through the Civil War with a focus on regional development and Westward. This is a “D” course.


HIS*202, United States History II (3 credits) 
A systematic study of the United States from Reconstruction to the present, with special attention given to industrialism’s social, economic, and ideological impact, America’s changing ethnic make-up, race conflict, and changes in the United States’ international position through the two World Wars and the Cold War. (May be taken without HIS*201.) This is a “D” course.


HIS*244, Europe in the 20th Century (3 credits) 
Students will study Europe’s changing economic, social, military, and diplomatic trends from the late 19th Century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to the causes of the First World War, the Second World War, and the Cold War.